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more focused on washington, on the whole policy issues around the fiscal cliff because they are trying to figure out their spending plans guessing what taxes will be. businesses are focused on if they spend x and taxed at y what's that going to leave them in terms of profitability. degree of which businesses have come off a really good four years where the rest of us have come off a more problematic four years. finally in this quarter partly because of the fiscal cliff, partly because of europe, partly because of slow down in china profits are more challenging for companies. but they are still making a lot of money. >> "wall street journal" study of 40 major companies half plan drastic cuts to their investments and spending into next. once a budget deal is reached, i mean whatever it is, do you think we'll see companies loosen their wallet? is there a bigger chance they will slow down more? >> part of this is contingent how well consumers do. companies will spend money if there's this active healthy consumer base that justifies them spending money for more activities. so, at some point
the white house fiscal cliff package. the white house's proposal to avoid the big tax hikes and spending cuts that are going to happen in january, unless something is done. that proposal has come under heavy criticism from republicans who say wasn't serious. how speaker john boehner said he was flabbergasted. mitch mcconnell reportedly laughed out loud and in this debate over reducing the debt, the president is pushing for an additional $255 billion in spending. he wants those higher taxes to spend more, which is leading to some criticism. joining me now is brad blakeman, the former deputy to george w. bush. and chairman of the south carolina democratic party. a deal that is all about the republicans desire to cut back on the debt and deficit -- why would the president be proposing $255 billion in war spending? >> well, he's not. what he is proposing is shifting spending priorities. after those cuts, shifting priorities, and by the way -- this is infrastructure development. this is to make sure that people who have gone the payroll tax relief keep that payroll tax relief and expanding un
parties taking to the airwaves this weekend, trying to blame each other over the fiscal cliff talk. this is all happening less than a month until accommodation of spending cuts and tax hikes kicks in. right now, it seems like both sides are moving further apart from the deal. here is house speaker john boehner and treasury secretary timothy geithner. >> we are flabbergasted. we have seven weeks between election day in the end of the year. three of those weeks have been wasted. >> we are not going to extend an extension of the tax rates. we think they need to go back to those levels. if you don't do that, you have to ask yourself, whose taxes are we going to raise? were we going to find the money bring a balanced plan in place? jenna: senator lindsey graham, a republican known for reaching across the aisle, not looking at this with a great deal of optimism. >> i think we're going over the fiscal cliff. it's pretty clear that they have made this happen. they are not saving social security and medicare and medicaid from imminent bankruptcy. jenna: james is live in washington with more
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3